I have bought myself a number of VST instruments, some cheap and some expensive and I love them all, but I also have a few free instruments in my collection. It's obvious that the paid for ones are really good and will do everything that the free ones will do, so why do I have the free ones in my collection? For starters, simplicity. I like the simplicity of the free ones. I find they are a lot easier to learn than the more complex VST's. Another factor would be CPU usage. As they are smaller, with less features built in, they require less CPU. Each synthesizer does more or less the same thing, depending on the type of synthesizer but they all have their differences and you can create a unique sound from any of them, so why not try out the free ones? Since upgrading to cubase 9 I have had to ditch all my 32bit VST's as Cubase 9 dropped support for it's internal 32 bit to 64 bit VST bridge functionality. I'm ok with this as I found it confusing having some plugins in 32 bit and some…
Choosing an Audio Interface is one of the most important decisions I've made on purchasing hardware for my studio. I have been through 3 audio interfaces now and noticed the difference in sound quality in each one. All producers who are just starting out will have to make a decision of which audio interface to invest in, so I am going to share my experiences and advice on what to consider. The main things that come into consideration are budget, size, mobility and sound quality. If you are deciding what interface you should go for, the first thing to ask yourself is how far do you want to take your music productions. Maybe it starts out for fun and turns into something professional, or maybe you are at the point when you want to release professional productions on a monthly basis. If you just want something decent that does the job, don't want to spend too much money and fair enough, there are many audio interfaces you can purchase for about $100 - $200 that will support Asio, 24 Bit…
For many years I have struggled with getting good, powerful sound quality in my productions but I have learned many techniques which have helped me improve my production process. Sound quality comes from experience, so I'd like to share some important things to help out any producers who want to take their tracks to the next level. If you are releasing top sellers, then I guess this article is not for you. 1. Creating & tuning the kick Some producers sample kicks from other tracks to save them time. I prefer to process my kicks (until I can't get my desired result, then I resort to finding a good quality sample). The problem with using a sample is that it may be tuned in a different key to your bassline, which can cause muddiness in the production. When the kick is tuned to the bassline they are guaranteed to work well together. There are a few tools on the market which do the job, I'm a fan of the Sonic Academy Kick 2 Plugin. It's very useful for changing the pitch of the kick…